EL LIBRO DE LAS ILUSIONES PAUL AUSTER PDF

The Book of Illusions has ratings and reviews. Richard said: Rating: one furious, disgusted star of however many stars there are in a galaxy. Buy El libro de las ilusiones/The Book of Illusions Translation by Paul Auster ( ISBN: ) from Amazon’s Book Store. Everyday low prices and free . : LIBRO DE LAS ILUSIONES, EL () by PAUL AUSTER and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books.

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Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster. Six months after losing his wife and two young sons, Vermont Professor David Zimmer spends his waking hours mired in a blur of alcoholic grief and self-pity.

Then one night, he stumbles upon a clip from a lost film by silent comedian Hector Mann. His interest is piqued, and he soon finds himself embarking on a journey around the world to research a book on this mysterious Six months after losing his wife and two young sons, Vermont Professor David Zimmer spends his waking hours mired in a blur of alcoholic grief and self-pity.

His interest is piqued, and he soon finds himself embarking on a journey around the world to research a book on this mysterious figure, who vanished from sight back in Zimmer hesitates, until one night a strange woman appears on his doorstep and makes the decision for him, changing his life forever.

Paperbackpages. Published July 13th by Picador Paper first published David ZimmerHector Mann. United States of America. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Book of Illusionsplease sign up. It is really interesting David Yes it is; definitely. Also thought provoking and confusing. See all 3 questions about The Book of Illusions….

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The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster

Jan 23, Richard Derus rated it did not like it. My reviewwhich I’ve moved to my blog, says that and more. Apparently the hoi polloi slithering in from the Internet’s more sanctimonious quarters don’t agree with me, therefore I must be wrong. View all comments. Set in the late s, the story is paup from the perspective of David Zimmer, a university professor who, after losing his wife and children in a plane crash, falls into a routine of depression and isolation.

After seeing one of the silent comedies of Hector Mann, an actor missing since the s, he decides to occupy himself by watching all of Mann’s films and writing a book about them.

Sep 15, Will Byrnes rated it liked it. This review has been hidden pauul it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After having lost his ilusioones and children in a plane crash, writer and teacher David Zimmer is on a path of self-destruction, drinking, behaving badly around people, rejecting any and all understanding and sympathy. Soon after the book is published the wife of the supposedly dead film-maker contacts Zimmer to ask if he might like to meet the man him After having lost his wife and children in a plane crash, writer and teacher David Zimmer is on a path of self-destruction, drinking, behaving badly around people, rejecting any and all understanding and sympathy.

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Soon after the book is published the wife of the supposedly dead film-maker contacts Zimmer to ask if he might like to meet the man himself.

The Book of Illusions

There is much parallelism here, Zimmer with both Hector Mann, the ancient film-maker and Chateaubriand, the author of a lengthy autobiography that Zimmer is translating. In a way all three are dead. Zimmer and Mann had both attempted suicide. And a character in the book ultimately succeeds in such an attempt. What is real and what is illusion? Hector had been in the business of illusion, then had to present an illusion of himself for most of his life. Sometimes an illusion can be a helpful thing, as when Zimmer is comforted by Alma on the plane see below.

There is a passage in which Mann spots what he believes to be a blue stone on the street. He has a detailed plan of what he will do dde it, alive with human connection, only to find that pau, is a gob of spit. Yet the imagining was enough to alter his life course. Maybe illusions are what we tell ourselves, what we need, in order to survive. I enjoyed the book very much. It was a fast read, engaging, with interesting characters and enough suspense to sustain a level of tension.

Well, Auster does explain, but I found it unconvincing. I wish that I had kept better track of characters. No, auwter are not hordes of them. I just wish that I had tracked the braiding of the stories. There is much interweaving here, much that occurs for some that also occur for others. I was too tired while reading this to devote adequate attention to that. I was encouraged, however, to read more of Auster. View all 19 comments. Apr 18, Annet rated it really liked it Shelves: I have changed my mind about this book.

The first pages were tough to read and I wasn’t sure if I could make it to the end.

But the story grew on me. This book has been on my shelves for a long time, the first Auster I bought. The story line is intriguing: A man looses his wife and two children in a plane crash. In sorrow, he is fascinated by a silent movie actor, who disappeared from th I have changed my mind about this book. In sorrow, he is fascinated by a silent movie actor, who disappeared from the face of the earth a long time ago, and writes a book about him.

Then he receives a letter that the actor wants to see him I guess you either like Auster or you don’t. Paul Auster is not an easy read,always troubling in a way, but his style is beautiful, poetic and his stories always fascinating. View all 12 comments. Dec 28, Erik rated it really liked it Shelves: Paul Auster, you bastard! The man writes such depressing stuff. To explain myself I should say that I follow the Roger Ebert school of criticism.

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Roger Ebert cares more about how a movie makes him feel than on its technical merits. Granted, this is rather less valid in the medium of words on a page than the sound and fury of fi Paul Auster, you bastard! Granted, this is rather less valid in the medium of words on a page than the sound and fury of film, but I still stick to it.

I have no problem trashing Plath’s Bell-jar, regardless of its supposed literary merit or historical significance, because it bored and annoyed me.

But getting to the point of this book, let me break it down for you literary thugs: He is depressed, but then he sees a silent comedy on TV and laughs for the first time in long while. He then decides to write about the star of this silent comedy, a man named Hector Mann. In the course of this, he finds out that Hector Mann disappeared, but he may actually still be alive!!!

Stuff ensues, there are some themes brought up, there’s some angst, there’s some sex, you know the drill. And don’t worry none of that’s spoiler material, all on the first page basically. Worth reading for a few pieces of stellar writing. I was particularly impressed by how Auster writes about a film that doesn’t actually exist. I bought into it, I was convinced. It’s a story within a story within a story within a story ad nauseamand it’s true that the inner stories are better told than the outer ones.

I’m cool with that. If you likewise enjoy calling famous authors bastards, then I recommend this book to you highly. As a side note, a result of this novel, I had to add a new shelf called “bepretentious.

View all 7 comments. Feb 17, Jill rated it really liked it. By reading this book I have become a die-hard Auster fan. The man is amazing. So clever, so imaginitive, so poetic and almost profound.

This book rambles, and in doing so touches on so many intertwined narratives that one almost gives up on what was assumed to be the original plot and assumes the opening catch phrase was just another Paul Auster smoke screen story line.

But this one, even in creating such an intricatedly woven network of a character experiences, never looses sight of its ultimat By reading this book I have become a die-hard Auster fan.

But this one, even in creating such an intricatedly woven network of a character experiences, never looses sight of its ultimate goal – to explain how the supposed disapearance of a silent film actor affected the life of a professor and widower from Detroit.